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Kenmare Stone Circle, Kenmare. co.Kerry c.2500-1000 B.C

The Kenmare Stone Circle is located 5 minutes walk from the centre of Kenmare and is locally known as the ‘The Shrubberies’. It is one of the largest stone circles in south west Ireland measuring 17.4 x 15.8m and dates from the bronze age (c.2,200 – 500 B.C.). The function of these structures is still unclear but were probably used […]

Irish Accents

DNA of the Irish

Kilmogue (Harristown) Dolmen, Mullinavat. co.Kilkenny. c.3000-4000 b.c

This impressive dolmen is the Kilmogue Portal Tomb located on the eastern slopes of Brown Mountain, about 3 miles from the village of Mullinavat in co. Kilkenny. The name “Kilmogue” derives its name from the Irish Cill Mhóg or Mog’s church, referring to the Celtic deity Mogons, a god associated with mountains and whose name is cognate with “might”. These […]

Clonmines Medieval Borough, Wellington Bridge. co.Wexford c.13th-16th centuries

This interesting site is one of the best preserved and much over-looked medieval towns in Ireland. Clonmines probably began it’s life as a Norman settlement established by William Marshall in the 13th century as an alternative port to New Ross. The remains of this once considerable town include two tower houses, two fortified churches and an Augustinian Friary. The tower […]

Cool videos & drones promoting destination Ireland

Cool marketing videos & amazing drone footage showing destination IRELAND.. céad míle fáilte

Gap of Dunloe, Dunloe Upper. co.Kerry

The Gap of Dunloe is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Ireland for 250 years. This stunning narrow mountain road passes between MacGillycuddy’s Reeks and Purple Mountain in County Kerry and is about 11 km (6.8 mi) long. Within it are five lakes which are connected by the River Loe. Between the first two lakes is an old […]

Staigue Fort, Sneem. co.Kerry c.300 a.d (Caiseal Stéig – ‘the fort of the steps/ the windy fort’)

Staigue Fort is an ancient ring fort located in a spectacular isolated valley not far from village of Sheem on the Ring of Kerry. It commands incredible sweeping views out across Kenmare Bay to the distant peaks of the Miskish Mountains. This national monument is thought to have been built during the late Iron Age, probably somewhere between 300 a.d […]

Ninch Barrow Mound, Laytown. co.Meath c.400 a.d?

This mound located on the right hand side of the road between Julianstown and Laytown stands nearly 20 feet high and is 75 feet in diameter. It sits beside a modern bungalow and resembles a Norman motte (the bungalow’s address is also called ‘The Motte’! however according to excavations carried out by P.D.Sweetman in 1979 it seems to be a […]

Strokestown Park House, Strokestown. co.Roscommon 1730

Strokestown Park House, set on 300 acres of parklands is one of Ireland’s finest and most intact Palladian mansions. It’s centre block was completed in 1696 but was extended around 1730 by the famous architect Richard Cassels who added the wings. The house was further altered in 1819 by J. Lynn. It is also Ireland’s first Famine Museum, which occupies its […]

Murrisk Abbey, Murrisk. co.Mayo 1457

Murrisk Abbey was founded 1456 by the Augustinian Friars on the site of a former church reputedly founded by St Patrick. It is located near to foot of Croagh Patrick Mountain close to the sea overlooking Clew Bay and quickly became the preferred starting point for pilgrimages up the mountain. It still has a beautiful original east window with carved human heads […]

The National Famine Memorial, Murrisk. co.Mayo 1997

The National Famine Memorial is located in Murrisk in co. Mayo at the foot of Croagh Patrick and commands panoramic views over the landscape of Clew Bay. This striking sculpture was crafted by John Behan and commemorates the millions who perished during the Great Famine of 1845 – 52. It depicts a “coffin ship” with skeleton bodies in the rigging. […]