Collins Barracks is located on Arbour Hill in Dublin City on a site originally ear-marked for a mansion for The Duke of Ormond. It was built in 1702 and was one of the largest barracks in Europe, it also became¬†with the exception of the Royal Hospital at Kilmainham the earliest public building in the city. It was named after Michael Collins, the first Commander-in-Chief of the Irish Free State Army. Collins was killed in 1922 in co. Cork four months before the barracks was surrendered to the Free State Army. General Richard Mulcahy, who formally accepted the handover, immediately named the site after Collins. The old barracks, which had billets, stables, a riding school, drilling grounds and firing ranges, has been transformed sympathetically into galleries by the National Museum of Ireland for exhibitions. There are rare artifacts ranging from weaponry, furniture, folk life, silver, ceramics and glassware. It also houses a permanent exhibition about the Easter Rising, called ‘Understanding 1916’. Wolfe Tone, one of the leaders of the 1798 rebellion was also convicted of treason here.