Seefin Passage Tomb is located on a hilltop 1700 feet above sea level near Kilbride in county Wicklow. This national monument dates to somewhere between 3300 to 3000 b.c. The tomb’s name in Irish ‘Suidh Fhionn’ translates to ‘The Seat of Fionn’ and it gets mentioned in ancient stories as entrances to the Otherworld and the Homes of the Gods. It has also been symbolized as the belly of a pregnant woman where the passage is the birth passage and the chamber is the womb. To build this structure at this elevation today would be an incredible feat of engineering never mind 5000 years ago. The tomb has two decorated stones at the entrance that have faint megalithic artwork on them and a 30 feet long passageway that leads to 5 compartments. It measures 75 feet in diameter, is nearly 18 feet high and this is only one of what appears to be a series of tombs built at a similar altitude along the top of these mountains. One theory why locations like these were chosen is that the original builders could claim ownership of all they could see and by placing their ancestors far above the low lying lands of the living and could watch over them from their tombs. Seefin was excavated by R.A. Macalister in 1931 however no artifacts or human remains were found.